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Barry Benson" redirects here. For the Mississippi politician, see Barry W. Benson. Not to be confused with Maya the Bee (film). Bee Movie Bee Movie (2007 animated feature film).jpg Theatrical release poster What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

Music

Barry Benson" redirects here. For the Mississippi politician, see Barry W. Benson. Not to be confused with Maya the Bee (film). Bee Movie Bee Movie (2007 animated feature film).jpg Theatrical release poster Directed by Simon J. Smith Steve Hickner Written by Jerry Seinfeld Spike Feresten What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

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Barry Benson" redirects here. For the Mississippi politician, see Barry W. Benson. Not to be confused with Maya the Bee (film). Bee Movie Bee Movie (2007 animated feature film).jpg Theatrical release poster Directed by Simon J. Smith Steve Hickner Written by Jerry Seinfeld Spike Feresten Barry Marder What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

Television

Barry Benson" redirects here. For the Mississippi politician, see Barry W. Benson. Not to be confused with Maya the Bee (film). Bee Movie Bee Movie (2007 animated feature film).jpg Theatrical release poster Directed by Simon J. Smith Steve Hickner Written by Jerry Seinfeld What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

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What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

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Barry Benson" redirects here. For the Mississippi politician, see Barry W. Benson. Not to be confused with Maya the Bee (film). Bee Movie Bee Movie (2007 animated feature film).jpg Theatrical release poster Directed by Simon J. Smith Steve Hickner Written by Jerry Seinfeld Spike Feresten What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

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What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

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Barry Benson" redirects here. For the Mississippi politician, see Barry W. Benson. Not to be confused with Maya the Bee (film). Bee Movie Bee Movie (2007 animated feature film).jpg Theatrical release poster Directed by Simon J. Smith Steve Hickner Written by Jerry Seinfeld Spike Feresten What would happen if I lick a 1 mm cube of francium? Ad by Fiverr How do I create NFT art without paying for expensive software? When creating NFT art, you have a few options. You can commission a unique piece of art or a collection of characters or images distinguished by digitally-generated variations. If(Continue reading) 39 Related Sort Recommended Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Something vaguely similar to licking a similarly-sized cube of Rubidium (given Francium is less reactive than Caesium because of its’ electron orbital speeds), this is assuming somehow a stable isotope of Francium suddenly exists. 5 1 Related questions More answers below What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What happens if we touch Francium? What would happen if a 1kg block of francium was thrown into the ocean? What would happen if you ate Francium? What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? Profile photo for Joseph Lurie Joseph Lurie logician and philosopher in the tradition of Aristotle (who wrote on everything)Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021) and Malcolm Sargeant , Degree level applied chemistry + 20yr experience in corrosion prevention and water treatmentAuthor has 2K answers and 2M answer views5y Francium is radioactive, with a short enough half-life that it's not really possible to produce that millimeter cube. If you did magically produce one and proceed to lick it, you'd get a significant dose of radiation to the face. If you managed to do this quickly enough, some of the francium would react with your saliva in the usual alkali metal fashion, producing francium hydroxide and releasing a large amount of heat. So, in summary, you'd be suffering from thermal burns, chemical burns, and radiation burns to the same part of the body at the same time. Not a good day. 186 3 Promoted by Asana What is the best project management tool? Profile photo for Victoria J. Chin Victoria J. Chin Head of Product Marketing, Growth & Scale at Asana (company) (2020–present)1y I might be a little biased, but as an Asana employee, I believe Asana is the best project management tool. With Asana, my entire team has a central source of truth so they know exactly who’s doing what by when. We can track all of our tasks and stay aligned on our team goals. This has bee (Continue reading) Profile photo for Daniel McIntyre Daniel McIntyre Studied at Bishop Carroll Senior High SchoolAuthor has 55 answers and 130.7K answer views5y Like astatine, we don’t know what francium looks like, because a sample of it large enough to be seen would produce enough decay heat to immediately self-vaporize. I think your face and tongue would be better off if you tried to lick a few campfire flames, or condensed droplets from the spout of a vigorously boiling kettle Of course, a whole host of compounds would be forming simultaneously, including those of radium and astatine, thanks to those go-getters among the francium that were first to transmute into something a little friendlier. Those would soon reshuffle themselves into choice nutri Continue Reading 2 Profile photo for Duncan Oliver Duncan Oliver B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines (Graduated 2017)Author has 566 answers and 1.3M answer viewsUpdated 5y Related What would happen if 1 mm copper wire between Earth and Mars suddenly appeared? The Earth is moving at very high speed relative to Mars, but this wouldn’t actually snap the copper wire, and neither would the Earth’s rotation. Why? Because their relative motion, while large in absolute terms, is very slow as a fraction of the distance between them, and copper wire can stretch. Unfortunately, the wire would snap anyway. A copper wire has a breaking length of 2.5 kilometers under Earth’s gravity, and around 6 km under Mars’s gravity. Exactly how it would break is difficult to say: if the copper magically appeared with no load on it whatsoever, a wave would travel up the wire Continue Reading 166 7 Profile photo for Jessica Cho Jessica Cho Quora User at Quora (product)Author has 135 answers and 1.7M answer views5y Related What would happen if I licked a brick? Bob was a protester at the wall construction. He brought his whole family along, including his 6 year old son, Calvin. Calvin was attracted to a pile of old bricks sitting by the side. He walked past the sign that said “garbage disposal” and licked a brick. Calvin then took this brick and put it on people’s phone and bricked them. After that he showed his parents the place where he licked the brick. Bob gasped in horror. He said, “where’d you get that brick?!” Calvin responded, “from the garbage disposal pile.” Bob was speechless for a moment, but then said: “That brick was in there because it wou Continue Reading 51 3 Sponsored by Amazon Web Services (AWS) Amazon Web Services Free Virtual Event: AWS Summit Online. New to the cloud and want to learn more? Join AWS Summit Online for training and help from AWS experts. Sign Up Profile photo for Scott Soloway Scott Soloway Degree in math and physics but majored in pinballAuthor has 5.3K answers and 6.5M answer views6y Related What would happen if you ate Francium? Originally Answered: What if you ate Francium? Absolutely nothing. With the total amount of naturally occurring Francium in the world being estimated at 30g and quantities of synthetic material being vanishingly small, the amount you would be able to eat would be too tiny to have any effect. Being the most reactive ( we assume) of all alkali metals, if you were somehow able to manufacture a large quantity of Francium very quickly ( the half life is just 22 minutes) and pop it in your mouth it would blow your head off- quite literally. So you never would get to eat it. Good thing too as this prevents the agony of the radiation burns. 10 Profile photo for Alan Marble Alan Marble Author has 4K answers and 10.6M answer views5y Related What would happen if 1 km big cube of gold suddenly appeared in Russia? Your cube would weigh 19.3 billion metric tons. I hope it has appeared at rest on the ground, otherwise it’s going to make an almighty crash. It may well even push its way into the ground a bit - gold is really, really dense. Anyway, this is more gold than has been mined in the history of civilization, by a factor of greater than 100,000. There would suddenly be an overabundance of gold in the world and its value would plummet dramatically. Sure, Russia (or whatever country hosted this giant cube) could refuse to break it down and export it except on their own terms in hopes of cashing in, but j Continue Reading 491 24 Profile photo for Mike Miller Mike Miller Studied Materials Science and EngineeringAuthor has 10.7K answers and 47.8M answer views2y Related What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? What would happen if a francium bomb containing 2kg of francium was dropped on a city and detonated using water? What sort of damage could it cause? First, high fives all around to the mad scientist that pulled that off. The longest-lived Francium isotope has a half-life of 22 minutes. Making 2kg of the stuff, getting it into a weapon, and dropping it into water is an epic accomplishment. Makes you wonder why they weren’t revolutionizing the world with bulk transmutation or whatever other hat trick they used. Anyway, there’d be a fairly energetic “boom!” in the water as Francium liberated lots o Continue Reading 58 1 Profile photo for Dave Consiglio Dave Consiglio I've been a chemistry teacher and professor for nearly 20 years.Upvoted by Tara Nitka , PhD Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso (2021)Author has 6.8K answers and 87.4M answer views5y Related What if I drop Francium into the ocean? It reacts violently to form (briefly) Francium Hydroxide. The Francium would then rapidly decay. See: Dave Consiglio's answer to What would happen in a reaction between Fluorine and Francium? for more info on that decay process. 40 Profile photo for Yuan Gao Yuan Gao EngineerUpvoted by Kate Fuego , PhD Earth Science, Texas A&M UniversityAuthor has 1.4K answers and 12M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? What would be like to live in the edge, literally? How would it effect gravity or climates, day and night? Would waves in the sea be different? What would a vertex be like? Originally Answered: What if earth were a cube instead of a sphere? To paint you a picture, imagine you were looking at Earth from space, focusing on one of the faces of the cube. Your eyes are drawn to a single, impossibly round sea, sparkling like a jewel, right in the middle of the face of the cube. Because gravity pulls towards the center of the cube, all water will pool in the middle of the faces of the cube where it's closest to the center of the Earth. In fact, if you wait for your spacecraft to slowly orbit so that you can get a side-on view of the ocean, you'd notice that the circular sea has a gentle bulge to it, caused by gravity pulling towards the Continue Reading 188 16 Profile photo for Josh Velson Josh Velson Chemical Industry ConsultantAuthor has 3K answers and 8.6M answer viewsUpdated 4y Related How much would a gram of Francium cost? There probably aren't more than a few grams of Francium on the Earth at any given time. If you had 1 gram of Francium, it would functionally cease to have any Francium in it in well under a day since Francium-223, the most common natural isotope, has a half-life of about 22 minutes. It would also be, not surprisingly, highly radioactive. When evaluating the prices of chemicals and materials, you have to evaluate them based on the value it provides. In this case, there is little value beyond novelty. Frankly, even if there were a use for Francium you'd be hard-pressed to sell it given its sh Continue Reading 110 17 Profile photo for Aaron Hilton Aaron Hilton StudentAuthor has 103 answers and 65.8K answer views4y Related How should francium be stored? It is impossible to store Francium, because virtually all Francium ever created decayed in

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